National Drug Master Plan 2013-17

By |Published On: June 26th, 2013|

The NDMP seems to be a cut and paste of it’s predecessor, the 2012- 16 NDMP. The present policy document seems to have been rushed through parliament to coincide with international Crime Day in June 2013. Maybe electioneering has something to do with the speed at which the document was published. From what we can understand, the only major changes are in fact to alcohol policy. Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is a problem among alchohol addicts which this document tries to address.
Remember: This is a policy document. It’s not the law. Kind of like a Govt wish list.

Download the National Drug Master Plan here:

National Drug Master Plan_2013 to 2017

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About the Author: Jules Stobbs

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2 Comments

  1. tgif1 August 6, 2013 at 2:24 pm - Reply

    Interesting article on IOL: SA plan calls for study on legalising dagga.

    On Monday the Cape Times quoted Gareth Newham, the head of the Institute for Security Studies’ crime and justice programme, and criminologist Liza Grobler as saying decriminalising drugs would weaken gangs as their main source of power and income would be ruined.

    Newham said if dagga were decriminalised, police could focus their resources and clamp down on harder drugs.

    But the master plan said the stance towards dagga, in South Africa and other countries, had since changed and further research become necessary.

    “There is a need for an in-depth investigation of the dynamics of (dagga) use and related harm in South Africa, as well as the relevance of current international/local policies regarding (dagga) use, including measures such as legalisation and/or decriminalisation,” the master plan said.

    “The results of this investigation should then be used to develop government policies, legislation, protocols and practices related to (dagga) use.”

  2. David August 6, 2013 at 2:23 pm - Reply

    Interesting how the words use and abuse are freely interchangeable in this document. All in favour of some form of treatment/help for abusers but responsible use is another thing.

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